fishingboatproceeds

fishingboatproceeds:

A health center in Southcentral Ethiopia that provides 24/7 emergency care to over 5,000 people living in rural areas. The health center is where many women deliver their babies, where you can get contraception (including Depo implants), and where a variety of illnesses are tested and treated. There’s also a lab with a hand-cranked blood centrifuge and a microscope where a lab technician types malaria and pneumonia infections.

In the first photograph, you can see Abdul, who leads this health center, explaining local disease rates to Bill Gates.

The second photograph gives you a sense of the health center itself (which has no running water and very little electricity). The third picture is the view from the health center of the huts where nearby families live.

The bottom picture charts under-5 mortality since 2004, when these health centers opened (along with the more rural health outposts, which I posted about here). The red line is Ethiopia; the gray line the world average.

In 2004, more than 11% of children born in Ethiopia died before five; today, it’s less than 7%. And as you can see, every year since 2004, the under-5 mortality rate has fallen faster in Ethiopia than it has in the world overall. Now, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but both the patients and health workers I spoke to agreed these rural health centers are working. 

(It’s also worth noting that Ethiopia’s under-5 mortality rate has dropped far faster than other nations, even those that spend much more on health. In Nigeria, for instance, 12% of kids still die before the age of 5; Pakistan, which is far richer than Ethiopia, has barely seen its under-5 mortality drop at all in the past decade. So the world has a lot to learn from Ethiopia’s health investments.) 

oxfamgb
oxfamgb:

Bothbeit is just 10 years old. He was shot three times in the head while running for his life in South Sudan. Miraculously he’s still alive. But now he faces the growing threat of famine. And he can’t escape this on his own. We have to act now.
The people of South Sudan have suffered enough. REBLOG this if, like us, you want to see a world without famine.

oxfamgb:

Bothbeit is just 10 years old. He was shot three times in the head while running for his life in South Sudan. Miraculously he’s still alive. But now he faces the growing threat of famine. And he can’t escape this on his own. We have to act now.

The people of South Sudan have suffered enough. REBLOG this if, like us, you want to see a world without famine.

theandrewgreen

Dire living conditions in Bentiu camp

theandrewgreen:

image

The 47,000 people who have fled to the UN base in Bentiu, South Sudan, lack most things. In some parts of the camp, 158 people are forced to share one latrine. Women and children swelter for hours waiting for their turn at a borehole. August downpours destroyed mattresses and clothes and replacements are virtually impossible to come by.

The only thing there is too much of is the toxic green water - left over from last month’s rain - a stagnant pool across much of the camp that flows into people’s homes with each new storm.

Click here to read my latest for IRIN.

theandrewgreen

South Sudan heads toward famine amid ‘descent into lawlessness’

theandrewgreen:

image

The Guardian picked up my story on the deteriorating political and humanitarian situation in South Sudan as fighting continues in the country.

Each new clash exacerbates the country’s desperate food security situation. The international community has warned that famine could arrive as early as December. At least 1.1 million people are facing emergency food shortages. And – until fighting stops – aid agencies do not have access to tens of thousands of people who need their help.

Click here to read the full story.

42degreesrex
42degreesrex:

World Making Progress Against Hunger, Report Finds, but Large Pockets of Undernourished Persist
Daniel Stone
"No one on the planet should go hungry.
That’s because the world’s farmers grow 700 more calories per person than the World Food Programme’s daily recommended 2,100 calories—an abundance of plants and animals that surpasses the daily needs of the world’s 7.2 billion people.
In most places, the challenge is access. Global access to food is improving overall, according to a report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization released Tuesday, yet challenges in the developing world—from poor infrastructure and political instability to erratic weather and long-term changes in climate—are keeping 805 million people from having enough to eat.”

42degreesrex:

World Making Progress Against Hunger, Report Finds, but Large Pockets of Undernourished Persist

Daniel Stone

"No one on the planet should go hungry.

That’s because the world’s farmers grow 700 more calories per person than the World Food Programme’s daily recommended 2,100 calories—an abundance of plants and animals that surpasses the daily needs of the world’s 7.2 billion people.

In most places, the challenge is access. Global access to food is improving overall, according to a report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization released Tuesday, yet challenges in the developing world—from poor infrastructure and political instability to erratic weather and long-term changes in climate—are keeping 805 million people from having enough to eat.”

pittipedia

pittipedia:

Sometimes we forget that the mission in photography is to ‘force’ you to look at the reality of life; the reality of poverty, injustice and corruption that affects many in the Third World Countries. The worse abuser of the poor little children is the one who knows about their situation but not coming forward to help. 

Working children are the objects of extreme exploitation in terms of toiling for long hours for minimal pay. Their work conditions are especially severe, often not providing the stimulation for proper physical and mental development.

Many children may have to work in order to attend school or financing their family members, so abolishing child labor may only hinder their education.

There must be an economic change in the condition of a struggling family to free a child from the responsibility of working. Family subsidies can help provide this support. 

Thomas Tham Joo Kit photographic work is a reminder of that, the things we don’t want to see or we forgot about. His images are moving, freeing and grieving but you can help to make a change. Make a difference.

Help and donate to: https://www.facebook.com/ELA.CIP

pulitzerfieldnotes
pulitzerfieldnotes:

 A young boy walks through the town of Wau Shilluk in South Sudan’s oil-rich Upper Nile state. The town recently had a serious cholera outbreak and is teeming with internally displaced people (IDPs) from the state capital of Malakal, which has seen some of the fiercest fighting in the country’s nine-month-old civil war. Like many conflict-affected areas, Wau has worryingly high rates of severe acute malnutrition. According to aid agencies, as many as 50,000 children could die from malnutrition by the end of the year.
Video online at the Washington Post


 Image and text by Ty McCormick. South Sudan, 2014.
Pulitzer Center grantee Ty McCormick reports from South Sudan where, after 8 months of civil war, the impending food crisis looms catastrophic for near 1.1 million people internally displaced.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

 A young boy walks through the town of Wau Shilluk in South Sudan’s oil-rich Upper Nile state. The town recently had a serious cholera outbreak and is teeming with internally displaced people (IDPs) from the state capital of Malakal, which has seen some of the fiercest fighting in the country’s nine-month-old civil war. Like many conflict-affected areas, Wau has worryingly high rates of severe acute malnutrition. According to aid agencies, as many as 50,000 children could die from malnutrition by the end of the year.

Video online at the Washington Post

Image and text by Ty McCormick. South Sudan, 2014.

Pulitzer Center grantee Ty McCormick reports from South Sudan where, after 8 months of civil war, the impending food crisis looms catastrophic for near 1.1 million people internally displaced.