globalissuesandawareness
humanrightswatch:

An Internet Freedom Summit … in Turkey?
The choice of Turkey as the location for the world’s annual Internet Governance Forum (IGF) might have been the conference’s most fundamental problem. But it was not the only one.
Thousands of stakeholders from around the globe gathered to discuss how to enhance digital trust, enable access, and prevent Internet fragmentation.
But perhaps the agenda was most notable for what it didn’t include: the question of Internet freedom in Turkey. Over the past year Turkish authorities have imprisoned journalists, banned Twitter, and blocked YouTube. Yet,“country-specific” panels and workshops are not permitted in IGF programs, so Turkey’s digital rights violations were missing from the agenda.
Not surprisingly, Turkey’s Internet freedom and governance problems forced their way onto the agenda anyway. Outside the IGF convention center, in the Google “Big Tent,” citizen journalist Arzu Geybullayeva directly challenged the Turkish government representative about his assertion that the shutdown of Twitter for 13 days wasn’t a significant infringement of free expression. Berkman Internet policy fellow Camille Francois challenged the government representative for his claim that the government was somehow not responsible for imprisonment of journalists on charges such as insulting the prime minister or raising corruption charges in news media. These confrontations generated enormous applause from the audience. 
Read more.
Photo: A man tries to get connected to the youtube web site with his tablet at a cafe in Istanbul March 27, 2014. © 2014 Reuters

humanrightswatch:

An Internet Freedom Summit … in Turkey?

The choice of Turkey as the location for the world’s annual Internet Governance Forum (IGF) might have been the conference’s most fundamental problem. But it was not the only one.

Thousands of stakeholders from around the globe gathered to discuss how to enhance digital trust, enable access, and prevent Internet fragmentation.

But perhaps the agenda was most notable for what it didn’t include: the question of Internet freedom in Turkey. Over the past year Turkish authorities have imprisoned journalists, banned Twitter, and blocked YouTube. Yet,“country-specific” panels and workshops are not permitted in IGF programs, so Turkey’s digital rights violations were missing from the agenda.

Not surprisingly, Turkey’s Internet freedom and governance problems forced their way onto the agenda anyway. Outside the IGF convention center, in the Google “Big Tent,” citizen journalist Arzu Geybullayeva directly challenged the Turkish government representative about his assertion that the shutdown of Twitter for 13 days wasn’t a significant infringement of free expression. Berkman Internet policy fellow Camille Francois challenged the government representative for his claim that the government was somehow not responsible for imprisonment of journalists on charges such as insulting the prime minister or raising corruption charges in news media. These confrontations generated enormous applause from the audience. 

Read more.

Photo: A man tries to get connected to the youtube web site with his tablet at a cafe in Istanbul March 27, 2014. © 2014 Reuters

globalissuesandawareness
humanrightswatch:


Afghanistan: Gang Rape Trial Badly Flawed
An Afghan court’s conviction of seven men for a gang rape was wholly undermined by numerous due process violations and political interference. The court of appeals should competently, impartially, and independently conduct judicial review of the September 6, 2014 trial and the resulting death sentences.
A Kabul primary court convicted all seven suspects of armed robbery and zina (sex outside of marriage) against four women returning from a wedding in Paghman district, outside of Kabul, on August 23. From the beginning, the case was marked by serious flaws, in the police investigation and in a trial that violated international due process standards as well as protections under Afghan law and the constitution. These included alleged coerced confessions and inadequate time to prepare a defense. Statements from President Hamid Karzai’s office calling for the suspects’ executions further undermined their fair trial rights and the independence of the court.
On the evening of August 23, the seven accused men, dressed in police uniforms and armed with Kalashnikov assault rifles, stopped two cars heading into Kabul, Kabul police officials said. The armed men forced the occupants out of their cars and took money and jewellery. They then raped the four women, one of whom was pregnant, by the side of the road. The barbarity of the crime has sparked widespread public condemnation in Afghanistan.
Photo: In a Kabul court room, officials escort two of the seven men accused of raping and robbing four women in Paghman district, Afghanistan. © 2014 Reuters

humanrightswatch:

Afghanistan: Gang Rape Trial Badly Flawed

An Afghan court’s conviction of seven men for a gang rape was wholly undermined by numerous due process violations and political interference. The court of appeals should competently, impartially, and independently conduct judicial review of the September 6, 2014 trial and the resulting death sentences.

A Kabul primary court convicted all seven suspects of armed robbery and zina (sex outside of marriage) against four women returning from a wedding in Paghman district, outside of Kabul, on August 23. From the beginning, the case was marked by serious flaws, in the police investigation and in a trial that violated international due process standards as well as protections under Afghan law and the constitution. These included alleged coerced confessions and inadequate time to prepare a defense. Statements from President Hamid Karzai’s office calling for the suspects’ executions further undermined their fair trial rights and the independence of the court.

On the evening of August 23, the seven accused men, dressed in police uniforms and armed with Kalashnikov assault rifles, stopped two cars heading into Kabul, Kabul police officials said. The armed men forced the occupants out of their cars and took money and jewellery. They then raped the four women, one of whom was pregnant, by the side of the road. The barbarity of the crime has sparked widespread public condemnation in Afghanistan.

Photo: In a Kabul court room, officials escort two of the seven men accused of raping and robbing four women in Paghman district, Afghanistan. © 2014 Reuters

globalissuesandawareness

opinions-about-things:

This is important for people to realize. Poverty is one of many factors that can result in limited choice in food and diet. Do not shame people for what they eat. You have no idea what their story is.

globalissuesandawareness

Unwed black fathers continue to be singled out for special scorn by everyone from conservative gadfly Gary Bauer (who blames them for crime among NFL players) to President Obama, who in 2008 told black churchgoers in Chicago that “what makes you a man is not the ability to have a child” and pledged to address the “national epidemic of absentee fathers.”

Over the past two decades, such views helped unleash a torrent of punitive policies aimed at raising the cost of unwed fatherhood. Yet the share of those having kids out of wedlock has continued to soar. In 1990, 28 percent of American births were to unmarried women. Today, it’s a record 41 percent, with much of the increase coming among low-income whites. More than a third of all children with single mothers live below the poverty line, four times the rate of those with married parents.

Conservatives have blamed the shift on cultural decay, immorality, and welfare benefits. Liberals have flagged the disappearance of well-paying manufacturing jobs. But when Edin started her research, it was clear that none of these explanations told the whole story. The disappearance of marriage was a true social-science mystery.

So she and Nelson decided to embed with their subjects. In 1995, while teaching at Rutgers University, Edin, Nelson, and their three-year-old daughter moved into a studio apartment near 36th and Westfield in Camden, one of the poorest cities in America. It was the beginning of two years of intensive fieldwork, followed by another five years of interviewing—or, as Edin puts it, “a rich opportunity for learning. Some social scientists will rent an office building and bring people in and interview them. But experiencing what other people are experiencing while you’re studying them is just critical.”

xoxomandierosexoxo

xoxomandierosexoxo:

Hello my lovely followers!! I am sharing this website everywhere I can in order to spread the word and get as much support as I can. 

Two weeks ago, my little brother was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma which is a bone cancer. Cancer is exhausting both physically, mentally, and even financially. He is 18 and in November, his health care runs out which means that 6 months of his chemotherapy, we will have to pay for.

Now I know that I am not Tumblr famous at all (I think I might have 100 followers) but PLEASE! Even if it is $20, $10, or just $5 please consider helping out my little brother, Jed.

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